Year : 2008  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 10--13

Zinc toxicology following particulate inhalation


Ross G Cooper 
 Division of Physiology, Birmingham City University, 704 Baker Building Franchise Street, Perry Barr, Birmingham B42 2SU, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Ross G Cooper
Division of Physiology, Birmingham City University, 704 Baker Building Franchise Street, Perry Barr, Birmingham B42 2SU
United Kingdom

The current mini-review describes the toxic effects of zinc inhalation principally in the workplace and associated complications with breathing and respiration. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Criteria were used to specifically select articles. Most of the commercial production of zinc involves the galvanizing of iron and the manufacture of brass. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 15 mg zinc/day. Metal fume fever associated with inhalation of fumes of ZnO is characterized by fatigue, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis, thirst, metallic taste and salivation. ZnCl 2 inhalation results in edema in the alveolar surface and the protein therein the lavage fluid is elevated. Particular pathological changes associated with zinc intoxication include: pale mucous membranes; jaundice; numerous Heinz bodies; and marked anemia. Adequate ambient air monitors for permissible exposure limits, excellent ventilation and extraction systems, and approved respirators are all important in providing adequate protection.


How to cite this article:
Cooper RG. Zinc toxicology following particulate inhalation.Indian J Occup Environ Med 2008;12:10-13


How to cite this URL:
Cooper RG. Zinc toxicology following particulate inhalation. Indian J Occup Environ Med [serial online] 2008 [cited 2023 Feb 7 ];12:10-13
Available from: https://www.ijoem.com/article.asp?issn=0973-2284;year=2008;volume=12;issue=1;spage=10;epage=13;aulast=Cooper;type=0